Book Signing & Survival Presentation: Saturday, November 15th at 2 PM

Come out for a Free Survival Presentation & Book Signing if you’re in the area!

cbs2

 

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

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FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS: BLOG SKILL SERIES: Live Capture Box trap

Many of you have asked for more details about the Live Capture Box trap that Bill, Dave, Andrew and I used to catch the Quail.  To my knowledge, this is a trap style that originates in Asia but versions of it exist all over the world.  It’s very unique in that it can be constructed from all natural materials.  Below I detail the trap design as well as the trigger I normally pair with it.

texas-trap

It all starts with 2 pieces of cordage and 2 sticks…

A length of cordage is tied between the ends of two sticks.  When tied, the length of rope should be a little longer (6 or so inches) than the sticks.  The shape at this point should be somewhat rectangular because the cordage sides are longer than the stick sides.  The length of your sticks will determine the size of your trap, in this case about 18″ x 18″.

box-trap-pretwist

Now, twist each stick so that cordage forms an X in the middle.  At this point, your trap should look fairly square.

box-trap-x

The coolest thing about this trap is that it’s held together with tension.  You start by sliding sticks one at a time in a log-cabin pattern UNDERNEATH of the string.  The string will be loose in the beginning but will start to tighten as you build up the walls underneath with sticks.  It is this tension that ultimately will hold all of the sticks in place.

box-trap-starting

Below is a trap almost finished using a natural reverse wrapped yucca leaf cordage – just like we did in the episode of FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS.

box-trap-almost

Here the trap is finished with the trigger set.  Now, let’s discuss the trigger system that I use with this trap.  It’s awesome AND simple!

box-trap-finished

 

 

THE TRIGGER

illustrating-trigger

This trigger system is very simple and is in essence a double trip line.  There is a pretty cool trick to making the trigger stick.  I use a pencil below to illustrate:

First, cut a slice in the middle of the trigger stick that is about 1/2 of the way through.  The saw from a multitool works perfect for this.

trigger-cut-one-side

Now, turn over the stick, move 1/2 inch down and make another cut 1/2 way through on the opposite side.

trigger-cut-both-sides

Then, with your thumbs at each cut, firmly snap the stick in half.

trigger-snapped

Nine times out of ten the stick will snap as shown above with 2 perfectly mated notches.  This completes your trigger stick.  The only remaining step is to tie two thin trip lines to one half of the trigger stick.  I typically tie them around the top of the bottom half.

trigger-tied

The other ends of the trip lines should be tied to the back 2 corners of the box trap – in this case, an egg crate.

trap-egg-crate

Now, assemble the trigger stick and prop up the front of the box.  You can see that the two trip lines are impossible for a small game animal to avoid when trying to get the bait that is located toward the back of the trap between the trip lines.

egg-crate-set

In the episode when we caught the quail, we used rose hips as bait and thin yucca fibers as trip lines.  The trip lines don’t have to be very strong because the trigger stick is very sensitive.

box-setting

 

CONCLUSION

The basic principle of this trap design can be applied in all types of environments, both urban and wilderness.  Use your creativity when it comes to cages – even a cardboard box will work!  Innovation is one of your most important survival skills!

creek-stewart-bug-out-book

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

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FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS: BLOG SKILL SERIES: Fatwood Pine Torch

In many of the episodes of FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS, I instructed the guys how to ‘carry fire’ from base camp to their individual solo base camps.  Oftentimes, this was quite a trek through the woods and the fire carry needed to last up to a couple hours.  In the pioneer settlement themed episode with Dave, Andrew and Bill, we made fire on Day 1 using a YUCCA HAND DRILL.  When it came time to send them each out on their own, it was raining.  Making fire with a HAND DRILL would have been impossible under those conditions.  So, I decided to send them each with a couple of PINE FATWOOD TORCHES.  I didn’t get a chance on the show to really explain where I got these and how to find them so I thought I highlight that skill in this blog series.

FGITW107_77

THE TORCH

The ability to source a torch that will burn upwards of an hour is a very important survival skill.  Not only can you use a torch to carry fire from one location to another but it has all kinds of survival uses.  It can allow you explore dark caves, hunt at night (frog gigging especially), travel at night, signal for rescue, and keep predators at bay.  It is an incredibly useful survival tool.

FATWOOD

‘Fatwood’ is a term for wood (typically in the pine family) that has become saturated with sap, also called resin.  Fatwood is sold in stores and online as fire tinder and is an amazing fire starting material.  Pine sap is extremely flammable and wood that becomes saturated with it will burn for a very long time.  Fatwood makes an excellent torch!  Fatwood can be shaved into thin shavings and ignited with just the spark from a ferro rod.  Pine sap (dry or oozy) can be added to fire starting tinder as a flame extender and is a great substitute for PETROLEUM jelly when making PET balls (cotton balls soaked in petroleum jelly).  Below is a photo of pine resin oozing from insect drill holes in the side of this pine tree.

pine-sap

FINDING FATWOOD

If you can find pine trees then you can find FATWOOD.  I find that many people are confused about how to actually find fatwood.  If you are, I hope to clear that up.  The easiest way to find FATWOOD is at the base of dead, low hanging branches on pine trees.

lower-branches

Pine resin (sap)  tends to collect at these joints and will saturate the bottom few inches of the branch where it connects to the tree.  It will remain there long after the tree has died.  In fact, for this post, I am using the dead pine tree shown below which has been dead for over 10 years.  Notice the dead branches along the trunk.  This is where I will be looking for FATWOOD.  Even though much of the tree and the branches are dead and rotting, there is still fatwood at the base of many of these branches.

 

old-pine

Here’s a closer look at a couple of the branches.

old-pine-branches

As I begin to hack into the base of one of the branches with my ax, you’ll notice that the wood inside has a rich amber color.  It’s also very dense.  This is fatwood and it is completely saturated with 10+ year old pine resin.

shaved-branch

In the photo below you can clearly see the difference between the resin rich fatwood in the branch (left) as compared to wood that came from the trunk.

fatwoodvsrotwood

As soon as you cut into fatwood you can SMELL the rich pine scent and it is sticky to the touch almost immediately.

fatwood-close

 

MAKING THE TORCH

You can even see the pine resin glistening in the sun on the branch I collected below.  Once you’ve chopped a resin rich lower hanging branch from a pine tree, you have to prepare it for lighting.

oozing-sap

It’s important to split the resin rich end to expose more fatwood surface area and allow oxygen to freely flow between the split.  This helps the torch to light and burn longer and more efficiently.

splitting-end

Once you split the end a few ways, press in some green spreader sticks to keep the splits forced open.

spreddersticks

spreaddersticks-close

CONCLUSION

Depending on the size, a fatwood torch will burn for quite some time.  I’ve found there is a ratio to estimate how long one burns.  If the stick is 2″ in diameter, it will burn about  1 hour.  If it’s 1″ in diameter it will burn about 30 mins.  3″ = 1.5 hours.  Basically, divide the diameter in half and that’s how many HOURS it will burn.

FATWOOD is an amazing survival resource and is an unrivaled material in the natural world.  I hope this tutorial helps you be able to identify, harvest and use a fatwood torch!

Have you ever used FATWOOD to start a fire?  If so, tell us about your experience in the comments below!

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Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

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FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS: BLOG SKILL SERIES: Paracord Survival Net

survival-fish-net-close

One of my favorite skills of the entire 1st Season of FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS was when Zach, Opie, Joe and I made a paracord survival net and used it in conjunction with a hand built rock weir to catch fish in a Tennessee river valley.

Methods of catching fish similar to this have been around for centuries so I take no credit for the concept.  In fact, remnants of stone fishing weirs still exist all over the world today.  A “WEIR” is simply a word that mean an obstruction in the water to help guide the fish where you want them.

Below is a well preserved ancient stone weir in China (more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-Heart_of_Stacked_Stones)  Pretty awesome, right?

ancient-w

photo credit: http://thescuttlefish.com/category/art/page/6/

Below is a less extravagant Native American stone weir in Wabash County, IN.  Stone weirs were literally used across the globe to funnel fish moving down stream into basket or nets, much like we did in the episode of FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS.

s-w-i

photo credit: http://americanindianshistory.blogspot.com/2013/05/native-american-fish-weirs.html

The Choke Point

Opie, Zach, Joe and I were able to find a perfect choke point in the river upstream from where we were camped to give this ancient time-tested method of catching fish an honest shot.  The river formed a natural choke point that allowed us to build a double layer stone weir with only a few hours of hard labor.  Stones were plentiful and readily available so it seemed like the perfect plan.

The Net

The plan was to funnel fish through the weir into a net – EXCEPT WE DIDN’T HAVE A NET.  The most time consuming part of this process was hand weaving our own net from scratch.  We did this using paracord.  Paracord is awesome stuff.  It has 7 inner stands that are perfect for net weaving.  These inner strands can be effortlessly pulled from the outer sheath – called GUTTING paracord.

paracord-7-strand

gutted-paracord

Once we ‘gutted’ some paracord, it was now time to start weaving the net.  It’s not difficult, but it is time-consuming!  We decided to make a circular shaped net that we could fit into the funnel portion of our weir.  I made the frame by wrapping a stout and flexible vine around itself in a circular shape.  I’ve made nets that are circular in shape and also ones that are long and flat.  The long and flat ones are gill-net style nets that are meant to be stretched across a stream or river.  These are much larger and more time consuming.

The knots I use are very simple.  The first knot, called a Lark’s Head, fastens the paracord strands to the frame.  You can see this knot in the photo below.

survival-dip-net-0

In the case of a circular dip net, these paracord strands are tied all the way around the frame about 1″ apart.  Below is a photo showing 3 strands fastened using a Lark’s Head knot.

survival-net-step-1

The next step is to tie (using a simple granny overhand knot) the inner strand of one hanging pair to the inner strand of the neighboring hanging pair and do this all the way around the frame.

survival-net-step-2

Once an entire circle has been made all the way around the frame you can move to the next row of knots, then the 3rd, etc…

survival-net-step-3

Below are some photos from one of my courses at Willow Haven Outdoor of students making both circular dip nets and flat gill nets.  These photos really help to illustrate the stages of net making.

Below, Lisa is working on her second row of overhand knots.

dip-net-survival-2

Below, Justin starts the 3rd row of a very ambitious gill net project!

flat-1

Kevin just finished his first row on his gill net.

IMG_2196 paracord-survival-fish-net

Lisa, just finishing the 1st step of tying all the strands on with Lark’s Head knots.

paracord-survival-net

Lisa, working her way around with overhand knots.

survival-dip-net-1

Lisa in the photos above made an awesome handled dip net that she left behind at Willow Haven.  (Lisa – I’m still hanging onto it your you !!!!)  Below are a couple photos of her finished dip net.

dip-net-survival-paracord

creek-edge-net

Here’s a shot of me working on our net during FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS.  Patience is NOT my best virtue and this skill is certainly an exercise in PATIENCE and DETAIL work.  Notice how we have suspended the net frame with paracord so that we can work all the way around while it is hanging.

creek-net

Below is a photo of Zach, Opie, Joe and I stacking our double layer stone weir.  Notice how each weir funnels the fish exactly where we want them to go in a DOWNSTREAM direction.

making-survival-weir

Below is a photo of the finished system for you to study.  The first weir is basically an insurance policy.  Only the 2nd weir has a net at the choke point.

double-weir

CONCLUSION

Hopefully these extra detailed photos and descriptions make this skill easier to understand and practice at home.  Like I said earlier, it’s not difficult but it is time consuming.  Expect to spend several hours weaving a dip net like we did on the show.  If you’re like me, you’ll be tempted to rush.  Resist the urge, as the quality of the net will suffer if you do.

 

creek-stewart-bug-out-book

 

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

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FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS: Blog Skill Series – COMING SOON.

blog-series-main-header

Well, Season 1 of FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS has officially ended.  The last episode aired last night.  However, the survival instruction from these episodes is just beginning.  When 6 days of filming gets edited down to 42 minutes, some of the details are bound to get lost.  Oftentimes, these details involve specific survival skills.

Consequently, I’ll be writing a series of blog posts over the coming months called FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS: BLOG SKILL SERIES where I describe in great detail many of the survival skills I taught these guys over the course of the 8 episodes.  From creative fire starts and tinder selection to traps, snares and shelter materials, there are so many skills from Season 1 that I can’t wait to teach you.

IT ALL STARTS NEXT WEEK!

Subscribe to the blog to be alerted of all new tutorials and news!

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

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FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS – EPISODE 3 – Don’t miss it!

ep-3-group-web

For those of you who are following the new survival television series I host on The Weather Channel called FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS, you don’t want to miss this Sunday’s episode.  This will be the 3rd episode aired and is one of my favorites!

This particular episode has a great mix of survival skills that I really think you will enjoy.  We build one of my favorite shelters of the whole season and we also have some pretty crazy wild edible encounters – including one of the largest GRUB worms I’ve ever seen in my life.  You’re not going to want to miss the guys’ reaction to “breakfast”!  Other highlights include net weaving, some primitive fishing, cool fire building skills and also processing wild edibles!

You’re also going to really love the 3 guys I take with me this week.  They are all very genuine and have a sincere interest in positive change.  Zach has battled with ankle issues his entire life and came to prove he can face Mother Nature and come out on top.  Opie is a fellow Eagle Scout who longs be reconnected with the wilderness.  It was great to spend a week in the woods with a fellow scout.  Lastly, Joe is a video gamer that needs a shock to the system.  Trust me, he got it!  Each of them will inspire you as they battle through this crazy week in a damp, cold river valley!

So set a reminder on your phone right now!  This Sunday night (August 24th) at 10pm Eastern ONLY on The Weather Channel!

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

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Don’t Forget – FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS – Sunday, August 10th at 10pm eastern

Wow – I have had one crazy week.  I’ve been in New York City all week promoting FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS and it’s been a blast.  I was on the TODAY SHOW Wednesday with Kathie Lee & Hoda – CRAZY!  Here’s the link to the segment if you missed it: http://www.today.com/video/today/55809202.  Below is a pic of me right before we went LIVE.  I was just trying not to pass out.

creek-today

I’ve also done 20 or so radio interviews and will be on WAKE UP WITH AL (ROKER) tomorrow – FRIDAY – at 6:40 am and then the AMHQ Morning Show with Sam Champion at 9:40 am.  We’ll be talking about the show and also hurricane survival.  Saturday, I’ll be in Tennessee for a series pre-premiere launch and to spend some time with some of the great folks who made this show happen.  Hats off to The Weather Channel, RIVR Media, the amazing production crew and of course the show visionary Evan Goldstein.

I’m writing mainly to remind you that the series premieres THIS SUNDAY August 10th at 10PM eastern ONLY on The Weather Channel.  This is the episode filmed during the POLAR VORTEX last winter.  Below is a pic of me and the guys in our massive wiki!  Those guys are freaking awesome!

inside-wiki

 

Mother Nature has a very unique way of stripping away the clutter and introducing us to a very raw version of ourselves.  You learn a lot about yourself when you’re exhausted, cold, hungry and thirsty.  I’ve long believed the wilderness can change people.  Tune in to learn some survival skills, laugh, sympathize, cheer and be inspired!

series-promo

OH, AND TELL EVERYONE YOU KNOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

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HANG OUT with Creek tonight, July 29th, at 8:30pm eastern

 

hangout

Hello everyone. JJ over at RealitySurvival will be hosting a LIVE Google Hangout tonight (July 29th) at 8:30pm Eastern with yours truly. He’ll be asking about the upcoming show – FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS – and also discussing survival life in general. If you get a chance stop on in and HANG OUT. You can participate live with your own questions and we’ll be on for about an hour. All you have to do is go to the URL below at about 8:30pm Eastern and you can check it out. Hope to see you there!

https://www.youtube.com/user/RealitySurvival

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

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APOCABOX: Spend less time finding your gear and more time using it.

I’m excited to OFFICIALLY launch the APOCABOX!  Even though I haven’t publicly announced it yet, the response has already been a bit overwhelming so a BIG THANK YOU to everyone who is already on the list for the August 15th Inaugural Shipment!  I can’t wait to see what you think!

apocabox-left-sub1

Sorry, I’m getting ahead of myself…

For those of you who haven’t heard of the APOCABOX, you should definitely watch my launch video linked below.  (Yes, that’s me in the screen capture!  Even more of a reason to watch this video!)

Video URL:  http://youtu.be/9eTRAd5qgmE

The DEADLINE for the next APOCABOX drop is August 1st.

Find out more at http://www.myapocabox.com.

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

creek-stewart-survivalist

8 Solar Fire Starting Tips You Must Know – AND – a FREE gift from Creek

Using the sun to start a fire is probably my favorite method of fire starting.  It amazes me every time.  The sun is an incredible survival fire starting resource but getting the job done can be frustrating.  I’ve decided to compile 8 TIPS that you MUST KNOW when using the sun to start a fire.  Any one of these can make the difference between getting the job done or suffering the consequences of failure.  For a limited time, I’m also giving away FREE one of my favorite solar fire starting tools – no strings attached, no shipping fees, FREE.  But, I have a limited number so I have to put a time limit on it – only 24 hours.  Details at the end of this post!

SOLAR FIRE STARTING TIP #1: FULL SUN

full-sun

I know this sounds obvious, but you must have FULL SUN when attempting solar fire starts.  It can’t be behind a mountain, building, clouds or even a thin layer of fog.  A powerful (or huge) solar lens may work with partial sun but rarely (if ever) will you have this kind of lens in an improvised survival scenario.  In my experience, the sun has to be completely visible with no obstructions.  It does not, however, matter where it is in the sky.  It works best when it’s at 12 noon in the middle of the summer and the sun it right overhead at it hottest point but isn’t necessary.  I’ve started solar fires when the sun low in the horizon in December with snow on the ground.  The sun DOES need to be completely and entirely visible.

SOLAR FIRE STARTING TIP #2: BONE DRY

Another obvious tip, right?  If I hadn’t seen so many people try to use wet or damp tinder in my courses then I wouldn’t list this tip.  The tinder you select MUST BE BONE DRY – especially when working in less than perfect conditions with less than perfect tools.

SOLAR FIRE STARTING TIP #3: ANGLE OF ATTACK

You must hold your lens (either magnifying or parabolic doesn’t matter) at a perpendicular angle to the sun’s rays.  The 2 lines in the letter ‘T” are perpendicular to each other.  Any angle less or greater than 90 degrees will reduce the amount of heat that you can generate.  The diagram below illustrates this a little better.

lens

When you use a less than perfect magnifying or parabolic lens, the angle of attack is critical.  It’s so important to hold your lens so that it is directly perpendicular to the sun’s rays at the exact point where you are located.  The sweet spot is 90 degrees  and any angle less or greater than 90 degrees will reduce the efficiency of your lens and thus your ability to smolder tinder.

SOLAR FIRE STARTING TIP #4: THE COLOR BLACK IS YOUR FRIEND

Light and heat are different types of energy but very much related when it comes to starting a fire using a solar enhancing lens.  With a solar lens we are trying to convert light energy into heat energy.  Understanding the physics behind why and how this works can absolutely save your life one day.  The color of the fire tinder you are using in conjunction with your solar lens can affect how fast or IF you’re successful getting an ember.  White or light colored tinder will REFLECT all or most wavelengths of light so the light is NOT converted to heat and the temperature of your tinder may not get hot enough to burn and smolder.  However, black or dark colored tinder will ABSORB all or most wavelengths of light, converting them to heat and increasing the temperature of your tinder.

Creek, does this mean I can’t use white or light colored tinder to start a solar fire?

No, it doesn’t.  In fact, we use light colored crushed up punky wood to start solar fires all the time in my courses here at Willow Haven Outdoor.  However, in a survival scenario, every detail matters and you may be working in less than perfect conditions with a less than perfect lens on a less than perfect timeline.  Anything you can do to gain a competitive edge and increase your fire starting chances is a good thing.  Choosing and using dark colored tinder is just one strategy that can help.

A few darkening hacks!  Below are some things I’ve done in the field to darken light colored tinders so that they absorb more light and thus get hotter faster.

  • Rub on dry dark dirt.  I’ve rubbed on dark dirt to make light colored punky wood darker before.  Don’t use MUD because your tinder must be dry.  In the photo below I’ve rubbed dirt on a napkin to create a dark spot for smoldering.

dirt-napkin

  • Rub on charcoal from an old fire.  Maybe your old fire has gone out or you’re able to find a charred log.  The charcoal from something already burnt can be used to darken existing dry tinder.  It can also be used as tinder!  Charcoal is a great solar fire starting material for getting an ember.
  • Use a pencil, ink pen or marker.  I’ve actually colored tinder in the field with a Sharpie marker before and it worked awesome!  The graphite led from a pencil works as well.  So does black colored ink.  GET CREATIVE!  In the photo below I’ve colored punky wood with a Sharpie marker for a quick and easy solar ember.

sharpie-punky

 SOLAR FIRE STARTING TIP #5: FOCUS! FOCUS! FOCUS!

When using a solar lens, it’s all about the focal point!  This one is a deal-breaker.  The best way to get the focal point is to start with your lens very close to the tinder (at a 90 degree angle to the sun rays like described above) and slowly draw it back.  You will see the beam of light through your lens (or parabolic mirror) start to get smaller.  Keep pulling the lens away until the beam gets to it’s tightest possible point.  This is the point just before the beam of light starts getting BIGGER again.  This is the FOCAL POINT and it is at this point where you will start to create a fire.  Below is a 3 part photo series using a wallet sized Fresnel lens.

focus-1

focus-2

focus-3

SOLAR FIRE STARTING TIP #6: GO FOR EMBER, NOT FLAME

fat-guys-creek

(Like my subtle photo plug for my new show on THE WEATHER CHANNEL called FAT GUYS IN THE WOODS premiering on Sunday August 10th?  Read more about it here: http://www.weather.com/tv/tvshows/fat-guys-in-the-woods/fat-guys-woods-weather-channel-20140708)

I’ve found it much more difficult (often impossible) to go directly to flame using many different types of solar fire starting tools.  Unless you have an extremely powerful lens, you’re just wasting your time trying to go directly to flame.  The best strategy it to create a burning ember using your lens – THEN – place that smoldering ember into a prepared tinder bundle and blow into flame.  However, this is easier said than done.  In order to do this you must know what tinders you can use that will produce a smoldering ember using a solar lens – THIS IS THE REAL TRICK WITH SOLAR FIRE STARTING!

SOLAR FIRE STARTING TIP #7: KNOW YOUR SMOLDERING TINDER OPTIONS

If you only take away ONE TIP from this entire article, remember this one.  Smoldering tinder options are few and far between and must be chosen carefully.  Not all tinder will create a self-sustaining smoldering ember that can be dumped into a tinder bundle.  In fact, there are very few that will.  Below are my favorites.  REMEMBER THESE!

  • TINDER FUNGUS (CHAGA):  This is a fungus that grows exclusively on the BIRCH TREE.  It actually looks like black charcoal on the outside.  The inside is orange and very porous.  This stuff is the SHIZNIT when dealing with solar survival fire starts.  It smolders like no body’s business and has a very low ignition point.

tinder-fungus

charcloth

  • PUNKY WOOD:  Punky wood is one of my personal favorites because you can find it in almost any environment on the planet.  It’s basically dry rotting wood.  You’ve probably stepped on this stuff a hundred times in your yard or on a hike.  Fallen trees dead branches all go through a stage of decay know as punky wood.  It’s easy to crush, powder and pulverize (see next TIP).  This stuff smolders very well and will produce a self sustaining ember.  You can grow a punky wood ember to be the size of a basket ball if you wanted by just adding more crushed punky wood.

punky-wood

  • POOP:  Yes, that’s right – POOP!  Not yours, though.  My favorites are rabbit, deer, goat and moose.  These particular animals produce some amazing solar fire starting poop.  They are like little processed balls of solar gold.  They are dark in color, made of tiny particles of dry grass and leaves and smolder incredibly well.  They must be DRY!  Fresh poo just will not work.

poop-tinder

  • MILKWEED OVUM:  Now this is a jewel of knowledge that FEW people know.  Consider yourself one of the solar elite!  Milkweed ovum is the thin papery sheath that the fully milkweed seeds are attached to INSIDE of the milkweed pod.  This stuff is like nature’s tissue paper.  It has a very low ignition point and SMOLDERS!  Very few things in nature smolder and this is one of them!

milkweed-ovum

  • TEA & COFFEE:  Yes, you can generate a smoldering solar ember on tea and coffee.  Finely ground coffee can make a suitable solar ember and so can the pulverized tea leaves inside of tea bags.  You never know when this urban survival tip can come in handy.

coffee

SOLAR FIRE STARTING TIP #8: POUND, POWDER & PULVERIZE

Many tinders work much better for creating a solar smoldering ember when they are pounded, powdered and pulverized.  These include but are not limited to punky wood and poops (ha!).  I’m not sure of the physics behind why but I’ve had better success of getting a self sustaining smoldering ember on some tinders when they are powdered into a little pile.  This is just a tip to keep in mind if all else fails.

CREEK’S FREE GIFT

I’ve been asking a lot from you guys lately – to review my books, watch my new show, share things with your friends -so I wanted to give something back.  It’s not much but it’s a solar fire starting Fresnel Lens (shown in the photos above) that I keep in my wallet.  It takes up hardly any space and is the size of a business card.  I’ve started hundreds of fires with this thing over the years and it works really well.  It’s also one of the few fire starting tools that the TSA won’t hassle you for when you board an airplane.  It’s also a great lens to get started with when learning about solar fire starts.

I’M SORRY – THE FREE GIFT TIME DEADLINE HAS ENDED – THIS OFFER NO LONGER AVAILABLE.

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

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