Build a Bug Out Kindle: A Digital Survival Library at Your Fingertips

 

book-stacks

If you haven’t already, check out the article I wrote over at ARTOFMANLINESS.COM about putting together a BUG OUT KINDLE.  I list some of my favorite survival books as well as discuss the advantages of packing an entire survival library in your Bug Out Bag.  It’s not for everyone but certainly an idea to consider for some…

how-to-stay-alive

Have you considered an idea like this???

Here’s a link to the article:  http://www.artofmanliness.com/2014/06/17/build-a-bug-out-kindle-a-digital-survival-library-at-your-fingertips/

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

creek-stewart-survivalist

How To Disappear In The Wilderness: A Natural Camouflage Tutorial

I’ve been wanting to write this post for quite some time now but have been putting it off because it involves a certain level of commitment.  Finally, I decided to take a hit for TEAM WILLOW HAVEN (that’s you) and show you how effective natural ‘full body’ camouflage can be when done right.

creek-stewart-nat-camo

You never know when you might need natural camouflage.  Whether to escape and evade or to hunt and stalk, blending into the wilderness around you might be a necessary part of your survival scenario one day and it’s important that you understand the basics.  Luckily, the process is fool-proof – and – surprisingly fast.

THE BASE LAYER

It all starts with muddin’ up!  It goes without saying that this method of natural camo lends itself to warm weather scenarios.  This process also works much better on BARE SKIN.  I started the whole process by striping down to my skivvys and then scooped some goopy clay-mud mix from the edge of the pond.  There’s really no delicate way to do this – just smear it on!  I had to go Garden of Eden style in these shots with a Burdock leaf for the sake of decency.

creek-stewart-mud-torso

creek-stewart-mud-fce

creek-stewart-mud-full-body

Get it on nice and thick.  A thick, wet base layer is critical.  Once you’re all mudded up, the next step is pretty easy.

 

DUFF AND FOREST DEBRIS

Forest duff, debris and leaf litter cover the floor in every type of forest environment.  What better material to use than the stuff that exists naturally in the area that you’re in.  Just grab handfuls of forest debris and slap it all over your wet gooey base layer.  It will stick and as the mud dries, it will become cemented into place.  You can even roll on the ground.  You’ll be surprised what your fly-paper like body will pick up.

creek-stewart-face

 

creek-stewart-torso

 

creek-stewart-camo-smile

I know what you’re thinking – IT LOOKS ITCHY.  It’s NOT.  The mud layer protects your body from all of the little leaf and twig pricks that you imagine might be happening all over my body.  I am also impressed at how well this keep the mosquitoes at bay.  It’s certainly not 100 % effective but it does help.

NOW, DISAPPEAR

It’s amazing how quickly you can disappear using this simple 2 step natural camo method.  A few years back while giving natural camo a stab while hunting I actually had a squirrel run down the tree I was leaning against and eat a nut while sitting on my leg.  I kid you not.  I could tell he knew something wasn’t quite right but he had no idea he was sitting on a human!  It was an amazing experience and that squirrel was delicious (just kidding, I didn’t kill him).  And, yes, at that distance I could tell it was a ‘him’.

creek-stewart-natural-camo-face

 

creek-stewart-nat-camo-hollo9w-tree

 

creek-stewart-natural-camo-side-tree-2

 

creek-stewart-natural-camo-laying

CONCLUSION

Next time you find yourself being chased by a PREDATOR from another planet, don’t forget what you learned here – GET NAKED, MUD UP & ROLL ON THE GROUND.  In less than 5 minutes you’ll be an unrecognizable fixture in the forest around you.

By the way, my skin feels amazing.  I think I’ll start charging for ‘Natural Camo Full Body Treatments’.

That’s it for now – more great survival tips to come.  Have an awesome week.  MAKE YOUR OWN LUCK!

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

creek-stewart-survivalist

Baseball Bat Weapon Modifications: 6 Zombie Destroying Baseball Bats

NOTE:  These weapons are flat out dangerous and designed for entertainment purposes only.  Recreate at your own risk.

I’ve just finished a several week writing project that required way too much cerebral effort.  Quite frankly, my brain hurts.  After being trapped in front of a computer that long I normally feel like just going outside and blowing something up or burning through 1000 rounds of ammo as fast as humanly possible into my burning barrel.  Not this time though.  This time I fought the urge to be destructive and instead decided to do something constructive with my time, skills and energy.  Something that would make the world a better place.  Something, I decided, that would make my Mom and Dad proud.

So…I modified 6 baseball bats into Zombie killing death weapons.

If you’re the type of person that takes survival articles a little too seriously then you may want to skip this one because I’ll be the first to admit that it is absolutely ridiculous.  Sadly, though, I think I had more fun writing (and making) this post than about any other I’ve ever done – yes even more than the Ultimate Survival Shot Gun and The Swiss Army Survival Tampon.  Not sure what that says about me but it’s the truth.

So you wanna turn your Louisville Slugger into a weapon against the walking dead?  Below are 6 ideas to get you started.

Bat-chete

batchete-studio

I really wanted to make a version of the rusty spiked bat that everyone thinks of when they allow themselves to wonder about such things.  However, I wanted it to be different than anything I’d ever seen before.  What better way to make it different than to mount a machete to the end?  So that’s what I did.  A 12″ machete blade is bolted right into the end of the bat.  But that’s not it.  Just in case the machete blade doesn’t do the trick, eight massive steel spikes shroud the base for some extra collateral damage.  I topped it off with a cobra weave wrist lanyard because I don’t want an aggressive zombie running off with my bat just in case it gets stuck.  Batter up!

batchete-creek-stewart

batchete-2x4

batchete-peering

 

‘Tina

tina-studio

I call this one Tina for short.  Concertina wire, or popularly called razor wire, is some nasty stuff.  It’s like barbed wire except instead of barbs it’s lined with razors.  Typically reserved for warfare and to line the perimeter of maximum security prisons, I figured a nice nest of this stuff fence stapled around a baseball bat would be a pretty formidable zombie face smasher.  Geez, I cut my hands up wearing leather welding gloves just wrapping this ‘death wire’ around the bat.  I understand first hand why this stuff has such a bad reputation.  I remember watching prison break movies thinking, “I bet I could crawl over that razor wire.”  Well let me tell you, there ain’t no freakin’ way you’re crawling over this stuff.  Concertina wire was birthed in warfare and it gives off that eerie feeling when you look at and handle it.  If plants grow in hell I imagine they look like this stuff.  “Hey, zombie, I want you to meet someone.  Her name’s ‘Tina.”

tina-window

tina-creek-stewart-wilderness

The Flail

flail-studio

Oooouch!  With it’s roots in the Middle Ages, the Flail is absolutely barbaric.  I cut the last 6″ off a normal bat, connected it to a steel chain and then studded it with archery field target points.  This thing hurts just holding it in your hand.  These target points actually screw into studs that I mounted into the wood.  You could theoretically replace all of these field points with razor broad-heads if you wanted a spiked razor bat but the idea is to be able to replace damaged spikes ‘on-the-fly’ with a pocket full of extra points.  The spiral wrap paracord handle gives plenty of grip when the G’s from spinning try to rip it out of your hand.  The amount of momentum generated with just a couple rotations of the 5 pound spiked head is terrifying.  I think this weapon could actually elicit FEAR in ZOMBIES.  That’s how scary this thing is once it gets-a-spinnin’.  Home Run every time – guaranteed!

flail-spikes

flail-waist

flail-handle

Shard

glass-bat-studio

Look what you can do with a few busted bottles, some Liquid Nails adhesive, a L-ville Slugger and some demented creativity!  I should call this bat THE SHREDDER because that is what it would do to a zombie’s head, neck, face and chest with just one whack.  It’s a beautiful bat actually.  When the sun flickers through the colored glass it almost looks artistic and maybe a little magical.  I think the real magic of this bat, though, is it’s ability to make a zombie’s head completely disappear!

glass-bat-creek-stewart

nibw-survivalsnapshot-labels-small

The Scorpion

scorpion-studio

This 4 sectioned bat gets ‘em going and coming.  The middle two sections are studded with razor sharp steel spikes.  These are for gripping and ripping.  I’ve mounted a custom piece of weaponry to the end of the ‘scorpion’s tail’.  I took the pick from an ice ax and mounted it to a custom made steel spike.  This then gets bolted through the bat – a deep penetrating spike on one side and a jagged ice ax head on the other – no venom necessary!  This piece is best used as a whip – similar to how a scorpion whips it’s tail into prey.  The SPIKE and YANK motion is sure to do the trick on any approaching zombie.

scorpion-spikes

scorpion-creek-stewart

scorpion-stinger

Silent Night Sucka’

silent-night-studio

I thought this triple deckered beauty resembled a Christmas tree when I first held it up so I’ve lovingly dubbed it Silent Night.  I thought that was an appropriate name seeing that’s exactly what will happen if you clock a zombie with it.  Silent Night Sucker.  Nothing like a good game of zombie tee-ball.  A spiral wrap paracord handle gives plenty of grip because I imagine this thing would get covered in zombie muck pretty quick.  The three circular saw blades are razor sharp and I can’t even imagine the damage they could inflict if swung with proper form.  Heck, forget form, it wouldn’t matter – just swing it any old way you want.  “Swing away, Merrill.  Merrill, swing away.”

silent-night-duct-tape

silent-night-silhouette

silent-night-handle-wrap

Conclusion

See, I told you I wanted to do something constructive and I’m positive the world is a better place now having seen these zombie death bats.  Whether or not my parents are proud is still to be determined…

What would your zombie death bat look like?  Have a great week!

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

creek-stewart-survivalist

PS-  Several of these bats required some woodworking cuts, drilling and notches beyond my pay grade and skill level. I’d like to give a special THANK YOU to my Uncle Jerry who helped make the vision for some of these Zombie Death Bats a reality.

 

6 Strategies to Lighten Your Bug Out Bag

Is it time for BOB to go on a diet???

One very popular question I get is about Bug Out Bag weight.  Unfortunately, it’s never that there is TOO MUCH space left over in the pack.  I’m always ask for ideas about how to reduce pack weight and eliminate unnecessary items.  Below are 6 tips I’ve come up with for cutting weight from your BOB.  Hopefully, one will work for you or at least help you brainstorm a creative solution.  I’ve found that when you’re really getting serious about cutting Bug Out Bag weight then you must go through your pack one item at a time.  You can’t just look at your pack from across the room and hope to come up with weight saving ideas.  This needs to be a methodical and strategic process that involves deliberate thought and consideration about every single piece of kit in your BOB.  This is a perfect process for a rainy Sunday afternoon.

TIP #1: Trim the Food Fat

By this, I mean cut out everything that has to do with food except for 6 high calorie energy bars (I pack CLIF bars).  The average human can survive for 3 weeks without food and still have no ill effects to the body.  In fact, I read one time that the record human fast was 1 year.  That makes eating less during a 72 hour Bug Out seem more than possible!  I’m not suggesting not to eat at all during a Bug Out, I’m simply suggesting to cut out all the food related items that you don’t need and only pack high calorie energy bars.  Things to remove include stoves, fuel canisters/tabs, pots, pans, silverware, spices – EVERYTHING related to cooking and eating food.  This stuff is bulky, heavy and at the end of the day, unnecessary for a 72-hour Bug Out.  DATREX Rations are another compact calorie dense food option.

TIP # 2: Sleep System

combo

Let’s face it, sleeping bags are one of the bulkiest and heaviest items in our BOBs.  I’ve long experimented with ways to reduce weight and bulk in the sleeping department.  One solution I’ve discovered is to go with a lighter and smaller higher degree bag.  Some of the new 50 degree rated bags are only $30-$60 and pack down to about the size of a small melon.  This alone isn’t sufficient for cold weather Bug Outs.  A way to add about 20 degrees to a bag like this and drop it to a 30 degree bag is to combine it with a reflective emergency bivvy like the SOL Emergency Bivvy (combo seen above).  It’s certainly not as comfortable as a nice fluffy ZERO degree bag but it sure weighs a lot less and takes up a lot less space if you need to drop weight in your BOB.  You’ll probably notice some condensation in the bivvy but a couple shakes and a few minutes in open air and it dries out quick.

bivvy

 

TIP # 3: Every Ounce Counts

Take a lesson from ultra light weight backpackers who literally account for every ounce of weight in their pack and weigh it on a scale.  Their motto is “Every Ounce Counts” and if there’s a way to cut out an ounce they will find it.  Some strategies I’ve heard of are:

  • Trimming the edges from maps (I’m not kidding)
  • Cutting down the tooth brush handle
  • Using lighter weight ‘tooth powder’ instead of tooth paste
  • Trimming unnecessary pieces from packs such as removing the sternum strap if you don’t use it
  • Cutting tags out of cloths, sleeping bags and sacks
  • If your electronics use AA batteries then find replacements that don’t use batteries at all or that use lighter weight AAA instead
  • Use titanium where possible; pots, pans, mugs, bottles, stoves, utensils, tent stakes.  It’s expensive but it’s as light as it gets.
  • Put pills and medicines in zip-lock bags instead of prescription bottles
  • Drill holes in stuff.  Anything that you can drill a hole in without affecting function will cut weight.

Along these same lines, try to stay true to the Bug Out timeline of 72-hours.  Try to only pack what you need for that specific timeline.  If you’ve tossed in a roll of dental floss, consider measuring out what you need for three days instead.  Same goes for soap, deodorant, etc.  You may be able to cut down the portions for several items in your pack.  This will certainly reduce weight.

TIP # 4: Clothing Items

Extra clothing is a luxury, not a necessity.  From a hygiene standpoint you should only be concerned about an extra set of underwear, socks and t-shirt.  Consider the clothes you’re wearing when you leave the house to be your only set (so dress in weather appropriate clothing BEFORE evacuating).  Then, for the sake of hygiene, pack only one SKIVVY ROLL.  A military friend of mine introduced me to the phrase SKIVVY ROLL.  It’s a way of neatly folding your socks, underwear and t-shirt into a nice compact bundle.  Folded this way, these items are easy to pack and easy to find and pack down into a surprising small little bundle.  Below is a photo tutorial about how to make a SKIVVY ROLL.

skivvy-roll

TIP # 5: Replace Your Tent Shelter with a Tarp Shelter System

bob

I personally pack a lightweight backpacking tent in my BOB – actually strapped to the outside as you can see in the photo.  However, a tent is a luxury.  You can really cut weight if you decide to pack a couple sil-nylon tarps instead.  Of course, constructing a tarp shelter certainly takes more skill than assembling a tent.  This reduction in pack weight does come with sacrifices.  First, tarp shelters are not as good as tents – I don’t care how you set them up.  I’ve slept in both many, many times and I’ll always prefer a tent except for the occasional perfect 40 degree fall night in October.  Tarp shelters always have at least one open wall which allows for the entry of a variety of nuisances – moisture, insects, snow, light, smoke, etc.  Below is one of my favorite tarp configurations that I call THE WEDGE.  A tarp can be erected this way in under 1 minute and provides excellent protection from the elements.  NOTE:  Wind direction comes toward the back!

tarp

TIP # 6: Replace Gear with Knowledge

You’ve all heard it before: Knowledge weighs nothing.  But boy does it takes up time!  Some would rather pack the weight than spend the time.  

Knowledge takes time.  Some would rather pack the weight than spend the time.  -Creek Stewart

 However, the more you learn about shelter, water, fire and food, the less gear you’ll need to pack – period.  I’ve long been a fan of redundancy in the CORE FOUR Survival Needs: SHELTER, WATER, FIRE and FOOD.  I often recommend that people carry a back up fire starter, or a water filter or emergency shelter in addition to their tent but these redundant items become less necessary as your level of practice and experience increases.  Is there an area where you can replace weight with knowledge?

Yo, you gotta tip?

What have you guys done to cut weight in your BOB?  I’m sure there are some really creative ideas out there that others can learn from and implement as well.  Don’t be shy, do tell.

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

creek-stewart-survivalist

Build A Guaranteed Fire Kit

Spring’s a comin’ and many of you are reorganizing your gear and kits for warm weather on the horizon.  I’ve written posts before about Survival Fire Kits but I’ve never listed suggested contents in detail.  In this post I’d like to share with you what I call a Guaranteed Fire Survival Kit.  When it comes to fire, I don’t screw around. I want guaranteed fire and I want multiple options to get it – no matter what The Mutha’ might throw at me.  This is my current fire kit and one that I believe is fairly thorough.  I’ve also listed the exact contents just in case you want to build your own or modify your existing fire kit.  The fully assembled kits are also available for those who may be looking for a turn-key solution: Creek’s Guaranteed Fire Kit

fire-kit-post

Below is a description of my Guaranteed Survival Fire Kit contents:

  • QTY 1: Maxpedition EDC Pocket: The entire kit is packed in the Maxpedition EDC pocket. I love Maxpedition gear and this is a great little kit. It’s a 5″x7″x.75″ clam shell MOLLE compatible case with tons on interior storage pockets and loops for all kinds of fire implements. It’s made from 105-denier water and abrasion resistant ballistic nylon fabric and is built like a little tank. It makes for a great packable fire kit container. It’s also triple polyurethane treated for water resistance and has taped interior seams.
  • QTY 1: Char Cloth Tin: This is a 2 5/16″ x 3 11/16″ x 13/16″ metal tin (Altoids size) with a hole punched in the lid. 100% natural fabrics like cotton can be made into Char Cloth, which is an outstanding fire starting material. When you have a fire, it’s important to plan for future fires. This tin allows you to make Char Cloth and plan for future fires. See my article here about how to make char cloth: CREEK SHOWS HOW TO MAKE CHAR CLOTH
  • QTY 25: 2″x2″ 100% Cotton fabric squares. These can be used to make char cloth using the tin above. These are sealed in a water-proof resealable bag.
  • QTY 4: Tinder Quik Fire Tinder: These are a compressed, cotton based, fuel impregnated fire tinder. They are also waterproof. Each of these will light with just a spark and will burn for a solid 2 minutes!
  • QTY 15: UCO Survival Matches: These storm proof matches come in a sealed reusable plastic waterproof match case with 2 replaceable strikers. Each match will burn for 12 seconds. These are like matches on STEROIDS! They are also wind and waterproof!
  • QTY 1: 9-Hour Candle: Whether using this candle to dry fire tinder or shaving off the wax to be used as a fuel extender, this is an often overlooked piece of fire kit. This sucker will burn for 9 hours!
  • QTY 1: Light My Fire Mini Fire Steel: Light My Fire Firesteels are my favorite. They are made in Sweden and are a really great piece of kit. This one is good for 1500 strikes and produces sparks that burn up to 5,400 degrees Fahrenheit. This is without a doubt one of the best fire starting tools on the market. It is small, compact and effective. It will great sparks in virtually any weather condition on Planet Earth.
  • QTY 6: FireStix: These compressed fiber and wax impregnated sticks will light instantly with flame or sparks. They will ignite even when wet and are odorless. Great source of kindling in a pinch.
  • QTY 2: Fatwood Sticks: This all natural fire starter is one of the best I’ve used. These are harvested from stumps of pine (fatwood) from the highlands of Mexico. With their 80% pine resin content, these little guys are extremely easy to light and work even when wet. These burn long and hot and will light about any fire you can imagine. They ignite with spark or flame – must shave into shavings to ignite with sparks.
  • QTY 2: 6″ length of Jute Twine: These pieces of Jute serve as the lanyard for the Fatwood Sticks. Jute is one of the best natural firestarting tinders on Planet Earth. Buff up one of these 6″ Jute lengths to make an instant tinder bundle. Invaluable fire-starter! Will ignite almost instantly with sparks!
  • QTY 2: WETFIRE CUBES: This is a man-made fire starting tinder that will ignite even while floating in water – I’ve done it on national television! One cube can burn up to six minutes. I’ve even used one of these cubes with my Esbit Stove before to make Ramen Noodles.
  • QTY 1: Solar Fresnel Lens: The sun comes up every day and no fire kit would be complete without at least 1 solar fire starting tool. I’ve used these little fresnel magnifiers to start fires countless times. They are lightweight and easy to use. Use it on char cloth, deer poop, punky wood, tinder fungus or any other fire tinder that will smolder. These will not produce flame. You’ll need to create an ember and blow it into flame using a tinder bundle (like the JUTE TWINE).
  • QTY 1: Punky Wood: I’ve hand gathered this punky wood from the forest here at Willow Haven Outdoor. This can be used to create a BIG FAT EMBER with the Fresnel Lens listed above.
  • QTY 3: Cotton Discs: These cotton pads (make-up removal pads) are perfect for catching a spark or mixing with chap stick, petroleum jelly or pine sap to create a long burning fire tinder.
  • QTY 1: Steel Wool: Steel wool is another one of those amazing fire tinders. It will smolder with just sparks and burns VERY hot. Use this to blow a tinder bundle into flame. This will ignite even after being dipped in water!
  • QTY 1: 6″x11″x3″ 5 MIL Barrier Pouch: This heavy duty resealable pouch can be used to keep extra tinder dry or to store more fire starting tools. I can also be used as a water container as well.
  • QTY 3: 4″x6″x2″ 5 MIL Barrier Pouch: These heavy duty resealable pouches are a perfect added layer of water proof protection for water sensitive fire materials such as cotton disks and punky wood.
  • QTY 1: Disposable lighter: Uses are obvious
  • QTY 1: Carmex Lip Balm:  This can be mixed with tinder fibers (Jute/Cotton) to make the flame burn much longer – also known as a fire extender. Click here to read about how I make PET BALLS: Creek’s PET BALL Recipe

Hope you’ve found something here that’s useful.  Your turn – what’s in YOUR fire kit?

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

creek-stewart-survivalist

The truth about eating insects: Can you eat bugs to survive?

We’ve all watched the scenes on survival television shows when the host chomps into the most disgusting bloated white grub for the sake of “survival.” Most of Western civilization cringes at the thought of it, while many in the East lick their lips in jealousy.

Eating insects for survival isn’t taboo for the majority of the world’s population. In fact, over 1,000 different insects are eaten by 80 percent of the world’s nations. This comes as no surprise if you’ve ever been to an Asian street market. Eating insects is so common that a word even exists to define it – entomophagy. With a scientific sounding name like that, it must be legit.

Like most reading this article, I have zero interest in eating grasshoppers for lunch today. However, as a survival instructor, it’s a topic that comes up rather frequently and one that warrants discussion.

plated-hoppers

All primitive cultures I’ve studied, including Native American Indians, ate insects. All primitive cultures still in existence still eat them as well.  In survival, all edibles are fair game, and I wouldn’t hesitate for one second to eat creepy crawlies when starvation is the alternative. I had an uncle who ate insects while held capture in the Korean war. He ate other unspeakable things that kept him alive as well.

Insects may sound gross at this moment. That’s because you’re not starving. Perspective is the first to change when hunger sets in. Things you’d never consider as food start looking edible. In the case of insects, not only are they edible, many taste good and are incredibly nutritious.

Believe it or not, most insects are edible. There are, however, some major classes that are more popular than others. Beetles rank in at No. 1. Caterpillars, bees, ants, wasps, cicadas, grasshoppers, termites, locusts, crickets, larvae and grubs fall closely behind. Insects are rich in protein, minerals, vitamins, amino acids and fats. They are surprisingly comparable to beef and fish in the amounts of these nutrients.

I’ve personally eaten a variety of unknown beetle grubs (raw and cooked – the cooked ones taste like bacon fat), crickets, larvae, earthworms (which taste like chicken skin cooked), bees and bee larvae, ants and snails.  I’ve found all of them to be surprisingly good.  It really is a mental challenge more than anything.

Regardless of what’s shown on television, there are some basic guidelines that should be observed when dining on insects in the wild.

Guideline No. 1: Avoid brightly colored insects. Typically, bright colors are warning signs in nature. This is no exception when it comes to insects. A brightly colored insect is nature’s way of saying back off. Choose insects with natural earth tones if given the choice.

Guideline No. 2: Avoid hairy insects. Hairy insects can irritate the mouth and throat. Oftentimes, hairs can also be disguised as stingers. It’s best to avoid insects that appear to be fuzzy or hairy.

Guideline No. 3: Avoid smelly and pungent insects. Scent is another natural warning. If the insect stinks or sprays some kind of stinking liquid, then avoid it all together.

Guideline No. 4: Cook all insects. Though some insects can be consumed raw, it’s always best to cook them (and any other wild game). Many insects contain parasites, and cooking can put your mind at ease. Cooking also softens hard shells and helps to eliminate the “ick” factor of squishy guts.

Guideline No. 5: Avoid insects that feed on poisonous plants. Snails and slugs are notorious for dining on poisonous mushroom and fungi.  While they themselves are edible, the stuff in their system might not be and could end up causing you problems.  The solution is to starve them for a day or so or purge them on other edible plants.  Don’t take any chances.  The calorie reward isn’t worth the risk.

Humans can survive for over three weeks without food. In fact, it is our least important survival priority. Shelter, water and fire are all more important. Survivors are opportunists and should never turn down an easy snack, even if it’s a cricket. Gathering food in a survival scenario is oftentimes a collection of many different sources, and the occasional insect could very well be a part of that mix.

Remember, it’s not IF, but WHEN.

creek-stewart-survivalist

 

7 Awesome Movie Survival Blades

In many movies, the cool knives get more attention than the actors themselves.  I certainly have my favorite survival blades over the years and they all aren’t necessarily knives.  You’re already thinking of some I’m sure.  Below are my TOP 7 SURVIVAL MOVIE BLADES.

 

# 1: First Blood: Rambo’s Survival Knife

rambo-knife

How could this knife not be #1.  RAMBO is synonymous with survival and this knife is basically where the phrase “survival knife” came from.  The design with hollow handle and included mini survival kit was revolutionary at the time and everyone had to have one.  This knife was my first survival knife.  I got a cheaper knock-off version of the authentic movie replica but I was 10 years old and didn’t care.  It was and still is my RAMBO knife.  I still have it.  It’s actually in a shadow box hanging on my wall.  This knife played a big part in my love for survival.  Below is the one I got when I was 10.

creeks-rambo

 

The authentic version looks like this.

rambo-first-blood

Here’s a link to a great history of the Rambo knives if you’re interested: http://www.cartertown.com/rambo1.htm

 

#2 The Edge: The Lockback Folder

edge-knife

I love that this knife isn’t an ‘in your face’ survival knife.  It’s a basic lockback folder.  THE EDGE is one of my favorite movies with a classic survival story; a plane crashes and a group of guys have to survive deep in the bush (while also being hunted by a blood thirsty grizzly).  Even though it’s just a movie, it is a simple reminder that even a basic every day carry pocket knife can make a huge difference in helping to provide basic survival needs.  If you don’t already, consider carrying an every day carry pocket knife.  It just makes good survival sense – you never know!

Want to own a knife just like this?  Here is the guy that made the movie version: http://www.lyttleknives.com/gedgcm.htm

 

#3: Book of Eli: Wicked Machete

eli-machete

This is definitely on my short list of favorite survival movies.  In my opinion, Eli’s machete is one of the coolest in any movie I’ve watched.  I think, though, that it’s his skill in using it that makes it so cool.  This is the trick with all good blades and weapons, the effectiveness is really in the hands of the one who wields it.  Choose your blade and practice using it.  Skill and effectiveness will soon follow.  That’s where the admirable stuff comes from.  Anyone can buy a knife.

The Book of Eli movie image Denzel Washington

 

 

#4: Rambo First Blood Part II: Rambo’s Push Daggers

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These daggers are often overlooked when discussing Rambo blades but these little suckers were critical in getting him out of mess.  He used them to lay waste to an entire boat full of bad guys.  Having back up blades on our person ‘just in case’ is a great idea.  There are so many concealable and comfortable options these days.  There is really no reason to ever be unarmed.  I love these blades and this is one of my favorite scenes in the whole Rambo series.

 

#5: The Patriot: Tomahawk

patriot-tomahawk

Ok, there is nothing cooler than accurately throwing a tomahawk.  That is just flat out awesome.  This scene where Mel takes out an entire mess of redcoats is gory but his use of the tomahawk is beyond impressive.  It’s no wonder why natives used them so extensively.  This is one of the few ‘tools’ that also doubles as an incredibly awesome looking weapon.  I was at the Blade Show in GA a couple years ago and met two brothers who make some of the coolest tomahawks I’ve ever had the honor of holding.  If you’re looking for a sweet hawk you have to check them out: http://www.2hawks.net/.

 

#6: The Hunted: Tom Brown Tracker Knife

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Benicio Del Toro uses this knife like a beast in the movie THE HUNTED.  Most people either love or hate this knife.  I like it.  The movie made it famous but I appreciate the unique design regardless.  It’s hard to design a new and unique knife and I think Mr. Brown did a great job keeping it simple and functional.  It’s definitely different.  I also like that it’s designed by a survival instructor.  It actually comes with a manual that describes the many ways one can use it.  Here is a link to the instruction manual if you’re curious: http://topsknives.com/pdf/topsknives_tracker_instructions.pdf.  It’s made by TOPS and some more photos can be found here: http://www.topsknives.com/product_info.php?products_id=155

 

#7: Crocodile Dundee: Dundee’s Bowie Knife

dundee-knife

Chuckle.  “That’s not a knife… this is a knife.”  You know you’ve said it!  This is one of the most famous movie quotes in the history of television.  I remember when you could carry knives like that.  Now, people look at you like you’ve got a bomb strapped to your forehead.  That fact still doesn’t sway my love for a good well-made classic bowie knife.  Though he made this knife style famous, they have the reputation to back it up.

 

Conclusion

I’m sure there are plenty of other great movie survival knives out there.  Which ones am I missing?  What are your favorites?  Have you ever bought a movie replica knife?

Remember, it’s not IF but when,

creek-stewart-survivalist

Bug Out Vehicle (BOV) Chronicles: The Urban Camo Layer : Series Post #5

If you remember, in Series Post # 4, I had just wrapped the truck in camo and left you hanging with some modern shaped black designs on a table.  Below are 2 pictures for reference.

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Below is a photo series showing how I used those black designs.  Also, I officially put the bed cap on, added some off-road lights and mounted 2 Jerry Cans to the rear fenders.  First, I had to tape on the matte black vinyl graphics for placement.

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urban-yet-3

 

urban-yet-2

 

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Now, time for the official install.

urban-rear-driver

 

urban-passenger

 

urban-hood

 

urban-front-driver

 

Now, time to add some IPF 968 Series Off Road Lights from http://store.arbusa.com/IPF-968-Series-Light-Kit-968CSG-P3643.aspx and 10 more gallons of fuel storage.

ipf-single

 

ipf-front

 

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Below is the reveal up until this point!

Thanks to everyone for their input into this project.  Even though I don’t use all the ideas/suggestions I appreciate the comments and advice.  All of it is making this a very fun BOV build.  If only I didn’t have a budget??!?!?!!

truck-side

 

truck-profile-side

 

 

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As always, thoughts and comments are appreciated.

BTW – I have some incredible news to share with you in the coming weeks.  I know I haven’t been posting much lately – I swear there is a reason and I also swear it’s worth it.  Stay tuned!!!!!

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

creek-stewart-survivalist

Bug Out Vehicle (BOV) Chronicles: Oh no he didn’t! : Series Post #4

Oh yes I did!  My apologies in advance to all of you BOV Purists out there – I had to do it.  I just couldn’t stop myself.  I know, I know… the original bad paint job would have blended better in a crowd of vehicles over the camo.  But trust me, this thing isn’t going to blend in after I’m done with it anyway.  For those of you who need a reminder what the truck looked like prior to this step then here are a few photos below.  The first is when I first got it.  The second is after a few exterior upgrades.  The third is how it looks during this post.

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front-angle

 

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Keep in mind that the photos below are still a work in progress.  This is not the finished truck by any stretch of the imagination.  In fact, this new camo pattern isn’t even done yet.  There is an entire other layer that goes on next.  I’ll give away a hint at the end about that.  I decided to go with a vinyl wrap for the camo.  I paid a little extra for a matte overlaminate to reduce glare.  I’ve always liked the desert camo colors so decided to go with a color scheme in this family.  I also decided to go with a big chunky pattern.  Everything about this truck is big and chunky so the new camo feels right at home.  Oh, and I mounted a tire to the Warrior Products spare tire mount.  A tire shop down the street had this one laying around and I picked it up for just a few bucks.  They were glad to get rid of it.  Again, I painted the rim with black grill paint.

Below is a photo series of the exterior updates…

 

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Don’t forget, I still have the matte black bed cap that goes on back.  Below are a couple photos to tease the next phase.  HINT:  These are matte black vinyl decals I hand cut myself.

design-2

 

design-1

Let me know what you think.  I’ll keep the updates coming.  I wish everyone an amazing New Year.  As for me – I better get this thing ready!!!  This could be the year of the Great Bug Out.

Remember, friends, it’s not IF but WHEN!

creek-stewart-survivalist

Bug Out Vehicle (BOV) Chronicles: Creek’s Project BOV Truck: Series Post #3

Since my last post I’ve taken some time to do a few interior upgrades to the BOV Truck Project.  First, let me remind you of what it used to look like with a few interior photos from when I first got the old fella.

 

IMG_2439 IMG_2436 IMG_2435

 

I’ve always said to choose a BOV that is a very common make/model.  This not only helps with parts availability post collapse but certainly helps when making any upgrades or replacements in general – even during times of plenty.  I was able to find replacement door panels and a dash board for reasonable prices.  These additions quickly cleaned up the inside.

 

new-dash seat-before door-panel-mag-light

 

 

Next, I ordered one of those Blanket Baja Seat Covers to clean up the seat a bit.  I think it turned out pretty good.

 

baja-seat-cover

 

Then, I added a few toys.  First, a driver’s side Mag-Lite / Beating Club.

 

mag-light

 

Second, I added a few mounts for some firepower.  I picked up a custom under dash mount right hand draw holster for my Glock 19 from Texas Custom Holsters.  It’s pretty sweet.

 

holster-1

 

Then, I added an overhead shotgun/AR rack from Big Sky Racks.

 

bigskyrack

 

You’ll notice also that I mounted a pistol grip rechargeable spot light.  This is from StreamLight and has an infinite number of uses both in and out of a Bug Out Scenario.

 

streamlight

 

On the dash I also mounted a canister of Tornado Pepper Spray.  It came with a pretty cool thumb release surface mount system.

 

tornado-pepper-spray

 

Just below and to the right of the steering wheel I mounted a Midland CB.  I’m a big CB fan and it’s one communication tool that myself and the others in my Bug Out Convoy will use to keep in touch while in route.

 

midland-cb

 

In the center console I mounted a fire extinguisher and custom aluminum billet quick release mount from H3R Performance.

 

holster-2

 

fire-extinguisher-mountfire-extinguisher

 

I also picked up an X-Grip cell phone window mount from Ram Mounts.  If the cell service works, great.  If not, I still have off-line maps loaded that can be used independently of cell and internet connections.  If you haven’t considered a Smart Phone App that allows off-line navigation, you may want to think about it.  The one I use with my DROID is called CoPilot GPS.  It does not require cell or wifi connections and is not Google Maps dependent.

 

ram-mount

 

The military used a chain that is bolted to the floor under the driver’s seat to lock the steering wheel to prevent theft.  I picked up a pad-lock for that as well.  Simple but effective anti-theft tool.

 

lock-chain

 

I’ve still got several interior upgrades planned, including dash mount 12V and USB charger ports, but I thought I’d share a quick update of what I’ve done so far.  The interior is looking pretty darn good – especially considering what I started with.

You’re not going to believe what you see in the next post!  I’m taking the exterior of this truck to a completely new level.  I know I should keep it plain but I just can’t stand it :)

Be well and Happy Thanksgiving my friends.

As always, thoughts and ideas are appreciated.

Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,

CR///EK

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